July 6, VIPA 2017 – Concert 4: Erik Drescher

Auditorio del Conservatorio Superior “Joaquín Rodrigo” – 19.30h. (7:30 PM)

Accelerate (2017)* – Parker Callister (USA, 1994)
for flute and electronics

Ligeia (2017)* – Amanda Bono (USA, 1987)
for glissando flute

Vox Succubi (2017)*Evan Anderson (USA, 1995)
for bass flute and electronics

Castillo Cave (2017)* – Ian Evans Guthrie (USA, 1992)
for glissando flute solo

Double Himalaya (2012)** – Alvin Lucier (USA, 1931)
for glissando flute and pre-recorded tape

You´ll see me return to the city of fury (2017)* – Diana Marcela Rodriguez (Colombia, 1987)
for glissando flute, tape and electronics

DreGliss (2015)** – Phill Niblock (USA, 1933)
for glissando flute and pre-recorded tape

* world premiere
** Spanish premiere

Erik Drescher

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Accelerate (2017)* – Parker Callister (USA, 1994)
for flute and electronics

This piece uses pressure sensors for each instrument. It is about measuring the changes in pressure between two points over time. The pressure sensors are constructed using conductive yarn and other resistive materials. The change in pressure is measured with a change in electrical resistance which controls certain parameters of the piece.

Accelerate, for flute and electronics, is an exploration in dissonance and microtones. The purpose of this piece is to show the threat that electronics pose on peoples’ focus and self awareness. The fixed track played alongside consists of sine waves that are slowly being altered in pitch to create tension against the sound of the flute. At first, the flute and electronics are somewhat cooperative with each other. As time passes, the electronic track begins to display slightly more erratic behavior, pulling the flute along with it until careening off into a world of its own, leaving the flute to begin again at square one.

Parker Callister is a multi-instrumentalist and composer born and raised in Ithaca, NY. His music draws influence from atonality, free improvisation, rock, jazz and noise music. Notable works include Three Questions for String Quartet, Ad Hoc for B-flat clarinet and piano, and a song cycle for tenor voice, electric guitar, percussionist, and electronics that is currently a work in progress. He is pursuing a Bachelor’s of Music in Composition at Ithaca College where he studies with Dr. Evis Sammoutis and Dr. Jorge Grossmann.

 

 

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Ligeia (2017)* – Amanda Bono (USA, 1987)
for glissando flute

According to Greek mythology, Ligeia is a siren: a lethal, yet beautiful creature who was known for luring nearby sailors with her captivating song. In Ligeia, the flute tells the story of the siren’s encounter with a young man, a sailor who got lost at sea and found himself on her island. Initially, the listener is drawn into the story by sounds of the wind and short bits of Ligeia’s song, and later, the sounds as Ligeia captures the sailor, and drawing him under water. As the piece unwinds, the music comes full circle, with Ligeia satisfied and peacefully waiting for her next victim.

Amanda Bono recently received her D.M.A. in Music Composition from The Catholic University of America in May 2016. An active composer of works for the concert hall and stage, her music is frequently programmed on concerts and during festivals in the United States and abroad. Recent commissions include works for The Etchings Festival, highSCORE Music Festival, Atlantic Music Festival, New Voices @ CUA, and The Atlantic Center for the Arts. Additionally, she has also been commissioned to create stage works for Synetic Theatre, The Shakespeare Theatre Company, and CUAdrama. In addition to writing music, her research interests include the music of the twentieth and twenty-first century, particularly the works of Ellen Taaffe Zwilich and other contemporary women composers. Amanda teaches Music Theory and Composition at Shenandoah Conservatory. She is a member of ASCAP, The College Music Society, and The Society for Music Theory.

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Vox Succubi (2017)*Evan Anderson (USA, 1995)
for bass flute and electronics

I have always felt that the character of the bass flute is subdued, hushed, nocturnal, and perhaps even sinister. At the same time there is something totally sensuous about its rich lower registers and timbre. The ghostly archetype of a succubus I feel captures these qualities with an appearance that is extremely intense and yet completely wrapped up in the fleeting of spiral of waking from dream.

Not that I have exactly first hand knowledge of succubi, but the idea of a paradoxically repelling and alluring surreal experience is something that greatly informs this piece.

Evan Anderson is an active Boston based composer. He began playing cello when he was eight years old and by thirteen was playing in the Melrose Symphony Orchestra. This musical environment nurtured an interest in composition which took on full fruition late in high school. Evan went on to study at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, MA where he received his undergraduate degree. While at NEC he studied with composers Kati Agocs and John Mallia and his music was continually premiered on the Tuesday Night New Music concert series.

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Castillo Cave (2017)* – Ian Evans Guthrie (USA, 1992)
for glissando flute solo

Castillo Cave, or officially Cueva de El Castillo (Cave of the Castle), is a famous cave in the Cantabrian Mountains in Spain. The cave contains numerous prehistoric paintings, which some date to nearly 40,000 years ago and attribute to a pre-Homo sapien species called the Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthals).

This piece begins with many jet whistles and key clicks, representing the intermittent wind gusts outside the cave. As the jet whistles become less frequent, you realize you are now in the mysterious cave, where you meander through the winding cave, admiring the paintings, tools, and other artifacts; meanwhile, gentle wind gusts (or are they the ghosts of the Neanderthals?) occasionally pass by. Eventually, we hear a neo-ancient flute melody, which may lead us to believe that it is an actual ghost; yet we soon realize someone managed to bring their toy flute into the cave and is playing variations on this melody. Unfortunately, we have come to the end of the tour, and it is time to leave, digesting everything we have seen and heard.

I wrote and dedicated Castillo Cave for flautist Erik Drescher, who premieres it at the 2017 Valencia International Performance Academy and Festival in Spain. I want to specifically thank the VIPA Festival for the opportunity to have this work performed; Erik Drescher for his helpful collaboration through the process; Bret Pimentel for permission to use his wind instrument fingering software to create the special fingering charts. I finally want to thank my grandmother Nancy Houston Guthrie and uncle Julio Mayer—who were two of the major donors to the project—and my parents, Michael and Dawn Guthrie—who further assisted me in many ways to make this experience possible.

Ian Evans Guthrie is emerging as a tour-de-force composer and pianist. He recently won 1st prize in the Arcady Composition Competition, 2nd place in the American Prize, and 2nd prize in the Great Composers Competition: Music of America, in addition to his many other composition and performance prizes and recognition from ASCAP, SCI, MTNA, National Federation of Music Clubs, Webster Community Music School, and other nationally- and regionally-recognized music organizations and clubs. In addition, many of his works have been performed publicly around the world from groups such as Indaco String Quartet, fEARnoMUSIC, Portland’s Metropolitan Youth Symphony, the Northwest Symphony Orchestra, the Moore Philharmonic Orchestra, and many others. Guthrie graduated from TCU – Texas Christian University with his master’s under a teaching assistantship, where he studied composition, theory, and piano performance, and will begin his Doctor of Music at Florida State University in Fall 2017.

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Double Himalaya (2012)** – Alvin Lucier (USA, 1931)
for glissando flute and pre-recorded tape

Double Himalaya was inspired by a drawing of part of the Himalaya Mountain Range given to the composer by Alice Schumacher of Portland, Connecticut. It was commissioned by and written for Erik Drescher. © Alvin Lucier

Alvin Lucier was educated in Nashua public and parochial schools, the Portsmouth Abbey School, Yale, and Brandeis and spent two years in Rome on a Fulbright Scholarship. From 1962 to 1970 he taught at Brandeis, where he conducted the Brandeis University Chamber Chorus, which devoted much of its time to the performance of new music. In 1966, along with Robert Ashley, David Behrman and Gordon Mumma, he co-founded the Sonic Arts Union. From 1968 to 2011 he taught at Wesleyan University where he was John Spencer Camp Professor of Music.

Lucier lectures and performs extensively in Asia, Europe and The United States. He has collaborated with John Ashbury (Theme) and Robert Wilson (Skin, Meat, Bone). His recent sound installation, 6 Resonant Points Along a Curved Wall, accompanied Sol DeWitt’s enormous sculpture, Curved Wall, in Graz, Austria, and in the Zilkha Gallery, Wesleyan University in January 2005. Recent instrumental works include Coda Variations for 6-valve solo tuba; Twonings for cello and piano; Canon, commissioned by the Bang on a Can All-Stars, and Music with Missing Parts, a re-orchestration of Mozart’s Requiem, premiered at the Mozarteum, Salzburg in December 2007. In October 2012 Two Circles, a chamber work, commissioned by The Venice Biennale, was premiered there by the Alter Ego Ensemble and in December 2013 a new work, December 12th, was performed by the Ensemble Pamplemousse at the Issue Project Room, Brooklyn and Firewood, performed in March 2014 by the Bang on a Can All Stars at Merkin Hall, New York. Lucier has recently completed two new chamber works: Orpheus Variations for solo cello and seven wind instruments and Hanover for violin, alto and tenor saxophones, piano, percussion and three banjos.

In 2013, Lucier was the guest composer at the Tectonics Festival in Glasgow, the Ultima Festival, Oslo and gave a portrait concert at the Louvre, Paris, with cellist Charles Curtis. Recent events in 2014 include three evenings of Lucier’s works presented by the International Contemporary Ensemble, in Chicago; two concerts at Roulette, performed by the Callithumpian Consort, as well several concerts at The Tectonics Festival, Reykjavik, Iceland. In October 2014 Lucier was honored by a three-day festival of his works at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.

Alvin Lucier was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States and received an Honorary Doctorate of Arts from the University of Plymouth, England. In November 2011 Wesleyan University celebrated Alvin Lucier’s retirement with a three-day festival of his works.

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You´ll see me return to the city of fury (2017)* – Diana Marcela Rodriguez (Colombia, 1987)
for glissando flute, tape and electronics

You’ll see me return to the city of fury is inspired by the MTV unplugged version of Soda Stereo’s En la ciudad de la furia – the title comes from one of the lines written by Gustavo Cerati (lead vocalist and guitarist of this Spanish rock band). The first 20 seconds of this song is a hypnotic cornucopia of reverb, delay, and pedals which serve as a framework for my piece. The flute reflects, triggers, and converses with the constant transformation of this excerpt.

Born in Bogotá, Colombia, composer Diana Marcela Rodriguez holds a BM in Composition from New World School of the Arts, and MM in Composition from the Boston Conservatory. Her primary teachers include Susan Epstein-Garcia, Marti Epstein, Dalit Warshaw, and Curtis K. Hughes, with additional studies under Nicholas Vines, Roger Reynolds, John Aylward, David Rakowski, and Franck Bedrossian. Her music has been performed by the Ludovico ensemble, the ECCE ensemble, Duo Opicaté and Boston Musica Viva.

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DreGliss (2015)** – Phill Niblock (USA, 1933)
for glissando flute and pre-recorded tape

phill niblockPhil Niblock is an artist whose fifty-year career spans minimalist and experimental music, film and photography. Since 1985, he has served as director of Experimental Intermedia, a foundation for avant-garde music based in New York with a branch in Ghent, and curator of the foundation’s record label XI. Known for his thick, loud drones of music, Niblock’s signature sound is filled with microtones of instrumental timbres that generate many other tones in the performance space. In 2013, his diverse artistic career was the subject of a retrospective realised in partnership between Circuit (Contemporary Art Centre Lausanne) and Musée de l’Elysée. The following year Niblock was honoured with the prestigious Foundation for Contemporary Arts John Cage Award.