July 16, VIPA Concert 6: Nomos Group

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Auditorio del Conservatorio Superior “Joaquín Rodrigo” – 19.30h. (7:30 PM)

Burning Moment (2016)* – DO Hana (1980)
for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano

Bridge 1-2 – Summit of Mt. Fuji (2014)** – Kaito Nakahori (1989)
for flute, bass clarinet, soprano saxophone, piano, violin, and cello

Watiparinga (2016)* – Samuel Lawrence Taylor (1992)
for flute, clarinet, tenor saxophone, violin, cello, and piano

Doux… (2016)* – Mathilde Côté (1991)
for flute, clarinet, violin, and cello

  1. Comme la pluie
  2. Comme la laine
  3. Comme les yeux bleus

The Body’s Voice (2016)* – Cesar Adrian Montufar (1990)
for flute and cello

Sonatinexpressive (2012)*** – Stefano Gervasoni (1962)
for violin and piano

* World premiere
** European premiere
*** Spanish premiere

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Burning Moment (2016)* – DO Hana (1980)
for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano

Burning Moment for Flute, Bb clarinet, Violin, Cello and piano was written by the image of fire. The fire or the flame that we can’t touch but we can feel with stare is similar to the sound that hasn’t the body although we can sense with listening. I wanted to be able to create a variety of sensory experience through the movement of sounds, such as the motion of the flame. Especially, I did try be represented the musical spatialisation by the various imitations between the instruments, the distinct directional movements & their intersections, the dramatic change of range, the repeat harmonic patterns & progressions, the parallel form etc. I would like the musical moment shared with the movement of each sound and the colorful senses in the resonance continued of deep sound.

HeadShot_DO Hana_VIPAShe began piano at the age at 6. She studied composition at the SUN WHA high art school for three years in the South Korea. Then, after obtaining the licence of music composition at the EWHA women University in Seoul, DO Hana decided to continue her studies in France where she earned her diplomas of composition and orchestration at the Boulogne Billancourt conservatory with the mention marked “Very Well” under the direction of Jean Luc Hervé (Composition), Pierre Farago (Orchestration) and Yan Maresz (Electroacoustic) in 2013 then graduated the licence of the music musicology at the university Paris Sorbonne in 2014. She is currently a master candidate in music electroacoustic at the university Paris Sorbonne with the subject of the spatialisation in the electroacoustic music under the direction of Mark Battier. In 2015, she was one of the winners in the flame of the  Tactus as a composer in residence during the 6th international Forum for Young Composer organizsd by the Musique Nouvelles Ensemble.

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Bridge 1-2 – Summit of Mt. Fuji (2014)** – Kaito Nakahori (1989)
for flute, bass clarinet, soprano saxophone, piano, violin, and cello

This piece was composed in 2013 when I visited Mt. Fuji, The tallest mountain in Japan for the second time. However, my internet in it has grown since when I was a child. I grew up in Tokyo, Japan, and even from inside of the city, there are many places where Mt. Fuji is visible when the sky is clear. Ever since I was a child, I thought that the mountain was very beautiful, and I was deeply inspired by the works of Japanese art based on that beauty. Since then, I felt climbing Mt. Fuji has always been something I have desired, I was very excited when I was given the opportunity to make that a reality. In 2012, I climbed to the top of the mountain at first time. Then, I found that there was no thrum of reverb in the atmosphere like I thought there would be. This is very intrigued to me. There seemed to be a dead silence that dwelled at the top of the mountain. When I re­visited Mt. Fuji in the winter in 2013, I remembered all of those thoughts and feelings and it has inspired me while writing this piece. In 2013, Mt. Fuji and Miho Pine Grove became world heritage icons. In light of this, I decided to start collaborating with several Mt. Fuji related organizations and museums. I have written several pieces based on Mt. Fuji; many of which (including this piece) displayed at Mt. Fuji Museum in 2014.

Kaito NakahoriKaito Nakahori was born in Japan on September 14, 1989. He began teaching composition and the piano himself when he was 14. While he was attending college in Japan, he got into contemporary music and he started his career as a composer at the age of 22 at his portrait concert in Tokyo. Harry Rolnick proclaimed his piece, Japanese Footbridge as “The music had the misty feeling of Japanese gagakumusic, court music so regal, that it seems static, only the colors changing. Mr. Nakahori blended his instruments with such impeccable taste, that the entire blend could have had a lulling, a mesmeric feeling on the listener.”

He has won numerous awards and prizes including Brian M. Israel Prize, and his pieces have been commissioned and performed worldwide by prestigious musicians, such as Aki Takahashi, Mari Kimura, Mayumi Miyata, Shiniti Ueno, JACK Quartet, Ensemble Dal Niente, at Suntory Hall, Merkin Hall, Jordan Hall, Sala Radio Hall, and so on. His first portrait concert in the United States was held at the United Nations in 2015. He also has given lectures and masterclasses in Italy, Argentina, Colombia and Japan. His film music composed for “After Spring, the Tamaki Family…”, has been nominated to the best documentary of 2016 Taipei Film Awards.

He recieved degrees from Toho College of Music (BM) and San Francisco Conservatory of Music (MM). Currently, he is Artistic Director and Conductor of Hai­Dao Ensemble, Composer in Residence of Khemia Ensemble, and part of a entertainment company in New York.

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Watiparinga (2016)* – Samuel Lawrence Taylor (1992)
for flute, clarinet, tenor saxophone, violin, cello, and piano

Watiparinga is a piece which draws its material from the natural colours of the tenor saxophone. The other instruments, which comprise a pierrot ensemble, emphasise and elaborate the colourful multiphonics of the saxophone, which serves as the odd one out in the ensemble. As the piece progresses the material begins to morph on its own, expanding both gesturally and colouristically, while regularly returning to the initial core material, which explores itself in a slightly different manner on each return. The use of polyphony and homophony also play an important role in the dramatic shape of the piece. While most of the piece features melding polyphonic textures, when it reaches the climax, the instruments for the first time engage in a brief, dramatic succession of homophonic timbral chords. Finally at the end of the piece, the initial harmonic material rewinds itself in retrograde, finishing on the same colour on which it began. Watiparinga is the name of a national park in Eden Hills, South Australia, which served as a significant source of inspiration for the composer while writing this piece.

IMG_3235 copy1Sam Taylor is an Australian composer born in 1992. His current music explores the careful extraction and layering of colours and timbres, either found in nature or derived from the harmonic series. Having lived in four of the worlds continents, Sam has found inspiration from music and cultures around the world, especially from the traditional music of ethnic minorities in Yunnan, Southern China. He finished his bachelors degree from the New England Conservatory (NEC) in 2015 and will be studying at the Paris Conservatory (CNSMDP) in September 2016.

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Doux… (2016)* – Mathilde Côté (1991)
for flute, clarinet, violin, and cello

  1. Comme la pluie (2min)
  2. Comme la laine (1min 30s)
  3. Comme les yeux bleus (1min 45)

Soft as a gray, humid and unstable rainy day. Soft and warm as wool running through the finger, caressing the skin. Soft, clear and endless like blue eyes.

Mathilde_Print_N&B_001Mathilde Côté was born and raised in the small town of Petite-Vallée, at the very East of Quebec province. Since all her family was working for an important festival for singer-songwriters, she was always surrounded by this form of art. She also began to learn classical piano at the age of 3, studying later in Montreal and Germany. She discovered composition around 16 years old, when she met composer Blair Thomson, who became her main composition teacher.

Mathilde currently lives between Montreal and her hometown, working in both locations as a composer, arranger, pianist and piano-voice-songwriting teacher.

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The Body’s Voice (2016)* – Cesar Adrian Montufar (1990)
for flute and cello

The title for this piece comes from one of Teju Cole’s photo captions on Instagram: “Walking is the body’s voice.” The Body’s Voice deals with the body as it expresses itself through movement. It uses the physical interaction between each performer and their instrument and plays with equivalent physical gestures between the two performers. The flute part’s movement is driven by breath and mostly internal to the performer. The cello’s movement is more like a choreography where sound is the evidence of motion.

YakuAdrian Montufar grew up in Quito where his initial approach to music was playing the flute. Montufar’s introduction to composition was an improvisation workshop run by composer Felipe Cisternas. He received his B.A. in music from Columbia University where he studied composition with Tristan Murail, Joseph Dubiel, and Arthur Kampela, and orchestration with Fabien Levy. Centering the bodies that are producing the sounds of a composition, both players and instruments, is a major focus of his music.

 

 

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Sonatinexpressive (2012)*** – Stefano Gervasoni (1962)
for violin and piano
╢╕Paride-Galeone_Milano_centro_san_fedele_27-11-10Born in Bergamo in 1962, Stefano Gervasoni began studying composition in 1980 on the advice of Luigi Nono: this encounter, as well as others with Brian Ferneyhough, Peter Eötvös and Helmut Lachenmann, turned out to be decisive for his career. After attending the Conservatorio Giuseppe Verdi in Milan, Stefano Gervasoni studied with  György Ligeti in Hungary in 1990, and then, in 1992, he attended the IRCAM Course in Composition and in Computer Music in Paris. The first three years in France launched Gervasoni’s international career that eventually led him to be artist-in-residence at Villa Medici in Rome for the biennium 1995-1996.

With commissions from prestigious institutions such the WDR, the SWR, the Orchestra Nazionale della RAI, the Festival d’Automne in Paris, Radio France, IRCAM, the Casa da Musica in Porto, the Festival Archipel in Geneva, the Divertimento Ensemble in Milan, the Ensemble Intercontemporain, the Ensemble Modern, the Ensemble Contrechamps in Geneva, the Maerzmusik festival in Berlin, the Ars Musica Bruxelles, the Festival Musica in Strasbourg, the French Ministry of Culture, Milan Teatro alla Scala and Suntory Hall in Tokyo, Stefano Gervasoni has established himself as one of the most important Italian composers of his generation. His catalogue – which includes chamber and vocal music, concertos, works for orchestra, for ensemble and an opera (Limbus-Limbo), commissioned for the 50th anniversary of the Percussions de Strasbourg (2012) – was first published by Ricordi, from 1987, and then, from 2000, by Suvini Zerboni.

Winner of numerous prizes, including the recent Premio della Critica Musicale “Franco Abbiati” (2010), his work has allowed him to be a grant-holder at the Fondation des Treilles in Paris (1994) and at the DAAD in Berlin (2006) and composer-in-residence at the Domaine de Kerguéhennec during the period 2008-2010. He has also been invited to teach at the Darmstadt Ferienkurse, on the courses organised by the Fondation Royaumont (Paris), at Toho University in Tokyo, at the Festival International di Campos do Jordão in Brazil, at the Conservatory in Shanghai, at Columbia University (New York) and at Harvard University (Boston). He has been composer-in-residence at Lausanne Conservatoire (2005) and visiting professor at ESMUC in Barcelona for the 2012-13 academic year.

Since 2006 Stefano Gervasoni has held a regular teaching post as professor of composition at the prestigious Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse in Paris.